Journal Article

Religious Influences on Sensitive Self-Reported Behaviors: The Product of Social Desirability, Deceit, or Embarrassment?*

Mark D. Regnerus and Jeremy E. Uecker

in Sociology of Religion

Published on behalf of Association for the Sociology of Religion

Volume 68, issue 2, pages 145-163
Published in print January 2007 | ISSN: 1069-4404
Published online January 2007 | e-ISSN: 1759-8818 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/socrel/68.2.145
Religious Influences on Sensitive Self-Reported Behaviors: The Product of Social Desirability, Deceit, or Embarrassment?*

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Religion
  • Sociology of Religion

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Religion appears to exert influence on numerous types of adolescent attitudes and actions. However, some researchers remain skeptical, attributing religious effects to selection processes, social desirability bias in survey responses, or a combination of the two. In this study we evaluate the evidence about social desirability and candidness explanations for apparent religious influences, and analyze data from a nationally representative dataset of American adolescents. Results suggest that while social desirability and embarrassment modestly diminish the likelihood of self-reporting some sensitive behaviors, they are neither associated with religiosity nor do they undermine apparent religious effects. We conclude that religious youth are not systematically at risk of providing unintentionally invalid or intentionally inaccurate self-reports of behaviors that are of a sensitive nature.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Sociology of Religion

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.