Journal Article

Social Workers’ Orientations toward the Evidence-based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

Danielle E. Parrish and Allen Rubin

in Social Work

Published on behalf of National Association of Social Workers

Volume 57, issue 3, pages 201-210
Published in print July 2012 | ISSN: 0037-8046
Published online August 2012 | e-ISSN: 1545-6846 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sw/sws016
Social Workers’ Orientations toward the Evidence-based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

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This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis was limited to master's level social workers), whereas 500 psychologists and LMFTs were randomly selected from the state licensing lists for a postal mail survey. The Evidence-Based Practice Process Assessment Scale–Short Version was used, along with 10 background/demographic questions. Psychologists with doctoral degrees reported, on average, stronger orientations toward the EBP process than did social workers with master's degrees, but the effect sizes for these differences were typically weak to moderate. Social workers and LMFTs were, for most comparisons, similar in their orientations toward the EBP process. More recent social work graduates had more favorable views of the EBP process than less recent graduates. The results suggest that although the EBP process is not yet widely implemented in its entirety, there are grounds for optimism about master's level social workers’ engagement in that process and for their increased utilization of research.

Keywords: evidence-based practice; implementation; practitioner views; survey

Journal Article.  5719 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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