Journal Article

Effects of Propylene Oxide Exposure on Rat Nasal Respiratory Cell Proliferation

Melva N. Ríos-Blanco, Shuji Yamaguchi, Mukta Dhawan-Robl, Winfried Kessler, Robert Schoonhoven, Johannes G. Filser and James A. Swenberg

in Toxicological Sciences

Volume 75, issue 2, pages 279-288
Published in print October 2003 | ISSN: 1096-6080
Published online October 2003 | e-ISSN: 1096-0929 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfg187
Effects of Propylene Oxide Exposure on Rat Nasal Respiratory Cell Proliferation

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Medical Toxicology
  • Toxicology (Non-medical)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Long-term exposure of rodents to propylene oxide (PO) induced inflammation, respiratory cell hyperplasia, and nasal tumors at concentrations ≥ 300 ppm, suggesting a possible role for cytotoxicity and compensatory cell proliferation in PO carcinogenesis. In this study, the effects of PO exposure on histopathology and cell proliferation in nasal and hepatic tissues were studied in male F344 rats exposed by inhalation for 3 or 20 days (0, 5, 25, 50, 300, and 500 ppm). Histopathology revealed an increase in mucous cell hyperplasia in the anterior nasal passages after 20 days of exposure (≥300 ppm). This was associated with the formation of goblet cell nests. Cell proliferation was measured in the respiratory epithelium (NRE; mucociliary and transitional) lining the anterior nasal passages, the nasopharyngeal meatus (NPM), and the liver using BrdU administered with 3-day osmotic pumps. Significant increases in cell proliferation occurred (>3.6-fold) in the mucociliary epithelium lining the anterior nasal cavity at and above 300 ppm for both exposure periods. In the mucociliary epithelium, the 20-day labeling was commonly associated with nests of goblet cells. Significant increases in cell proliferation (>2.3-fold) were observed in the transitional epithelium at 500 ppm after 3 days of exposure and at 300 and 500 ppm after 20 days of exposure. Significant increases in cell proliferation in the NPM (>2.8-fold) were evident at 500 ppm PO after 3 days and at 300 and 500 ppm PO after 20 days of exposure. No exposure-related changes in cell proliferation were observed in the liver. These studies demonstrate a clear concordance between the site and exposure concentration for tumor induction and those causing significant increases in cell proliferation in the rat nose.

Keywords: propylene oxide; nose; rat; cytotoxicity; cell proliferation; inhalation

Journal Article.  7445 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.