Journal Article

Growth, leaf anatomy, and physiology of <i>Populus</i> clones in response to solar ultraviolet-B radiation

Michael A. Schumaker, John H. Bassman, Ronald Robberecht and Gary K. Radamaker

in Tree Physiology

Volume 17, issue 10, pages 617-626
Published in print October 1997 | ISSN: 0829-318X
Published online October 1997 | e-ISSN: 1758-4469 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/17.10.617
Growth, leaf anatomy, and physiology of Populus clones in response to solar ultraviolet-B radiation

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We compared the physiological and morphological responses of rooted cuttings of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. grown in either near-ambient solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280–320 nm) radiation (cellulose diacetate film) or subambient UV-B radiation (polyester film) for one growing season. Midday biologically effective UV-B radiation was 120.6 and 1.6 mJ m−2 s−1 under the cellulose diacetate and polyester films, respectively. Gas exchange, leaf chlorophyll, light harvesting efficiency of photosystem II, and foliar UV-B radiation-absorbing compounds (i.e., flavonoid derivatives) were measured in expanding (leaf plastochron index (LPI) 5), nearly expanded (LPI 10), and fully expanded mature (LPI 15) leaves of intact plants of plastochron index 30 to 35. Plants were then harvested and height, diameter, biomass allocation and leaf anatomical attributes determined.

Net photosynthesis, transpiration, and stomatal conductance were significantly greater in mature leaves exposed to subambient UV-B radiation than in mature leaves exposed to near-ambient UV-B radiation. Concentrations of UV-B radiation-absorbing compounds (measured as absorbance of methanol-extracts at 300 nm) were significantly greater in mature leaves exposed to near-ambient UV-B radiation than in mature leaves exposed to subambient UV-B radiation. The UV-B radiation treatments had no effects on chlorophyll content or intrinsic light harvesting efficiency of photosystem II.

Height, diameter, and biomass were not significantly affected by UV-B radiation regime in either clone. Leaf anatomical development was unaffected by UV-B radiation treatment in P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides. For P. trichocarpa, leaf anatomical development was complete by LPI 10 in the near-ambient UV-B radiation treatment, but continued through to LPI 15 in the subambient UV-B radiation treatment. Mature leaves of P. trichocarpa were thicker in the subambient UV-B radiation treatment than in the near-ambient UV-B radiation treament as a result of greater development of palisade parenchyma tissue.

We conclude that exposure to near-ambient UV-B radiation for one growing season caused shifts in carbon allocation from leaf development to other pools, probably including but not limited to, UV-B absorbing compounds. This reallocation curtailed leaf development and reduced photosynthetic capacity of the plants compared with those in the subambient UV-B radiation treatment and may affect growth over longer periods of exposure.

Keywords: biomass accumulation; chlorophyll content; dark respiration; deciduous trees; diameter; height; leaf anatomical development; light harvesting; net photosynthesis; photosystem II; Populus trichocarpa; Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides; stomatal conductance; transpiration; UV-B radiation-absorbing compounds

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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