Journal Article

Seasonal photosynthetic responses to light and temperature in white spruce (<i>Picea glauca</i>) seedlings planted under an aspen (<i>Populus tremuloides</i>) canopy and in the open

Rongzhou Man and Victor J. Lieffers

in Tree Physiology

Volume 17, issue 7, pages 437-444
Published in print July 1997 | ISSN: 0829-318X
Published online July 1997 | e-ISSN: 1758-4469 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/17.7.437
Seasonal photosynthetic responses to light and temperature in white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings planted under an aspen (Populus tremuloides) canopy and in the open

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Photosynthetic light and temperature response curves were measured seasonally in seedlings of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) grown for two years in the understory of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) or in the open in central Alberta. Light-saturated rate of net photosynthesis, the optimum temperature for net photosynthesis, transpiration rate, photochemical efficiency, and stomatal and mesophyll conductances increased from spring to summer and declined thereafter, whereas dark respiration rate and compensation and saturation points were highest in spring. Depression of photosynthetic parameters was greater in open-grown seedlings than in understory seedlings during the periods in spring and autumn when night frosts were common. Net photosynthetic rates were similar in understory and open-grown seedlings in summer, but they were significantly lower in open-grown seedlings in spring and autumn. Significantly lower transpiration rates and stomatal conductances in open-grown seedlings than in understory seedlings were also observed at 15 and 25 °C in the autumn. Shoot and needle growth were less in open-grown seedlings than in understory seedlings. In summer, when irradiances were low in the aspen understory, understory white spruce seedlings maintained a positive carbon balance by decreasing their compensation and saturation points and increasing their photochemical efficiency compared to spring and autumn.

Keywords: compensation point; photochemical efficiency; saturation point; seasonal photosynthesis; stomatal conductance; transpiration; understory

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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