Journal Article

Effects of near-lethal heat stress on bud break, heat-shock proteins and ubiquitin in dormant poplar (<i>Populus nigra Charkowiensis</i> × <i>P. nigra incrassata</i>)

Michael Wisniewski, Jörg Sauter, Les Fuchigami and Valerie Stepien

in Tree Physiology

Volume 17, issue 7, pages 453-460
Published in print July 1997 | ISSN: 0829-318X
Published online July 1997 | e-ISSN: 1758-4469 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/17.7.453
Effects of near-lethal heat stress on bud break, heat-shock proteins and ubiquitin in dormant poplar (Populus nigra Charkowiensis × P. nigra incrassata)

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We assessed the effects of near-lethal heat stress on bud break, heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and ubiquitin in hybrid poplar (Populus nigra (L.) Charkowiensis × P. nigra (L.) incrassata). Shoots, with 10–15 buds each, were collected from September to March and exposed to temperatures between 20 and 60 °C for 2 h. Shoots were then placed in a greenhouse at 18–22 °C with supplemental light and cumulative bud break was recorded over a 4-week period. Samples of bud tissues were collected during and up to 96 h after heat treatment for protein analysis. De novo synthesis of proteins was monitored by exposing excised buds to [35S]-methionine for 3 h before, during, or after heat treatment. Heat treatments of 40–45 °C resulted in both a release from endodormancy and a decrease in thermal units needed for bud break during ecodormancy. The response to near-lethal heat stress was complex and was affected by intrinsic thermal sensitivity. Heat treatments were least effective during August and became progressively more effective as endodormancy progressed. In the later stages of ecodormancy, a heat treatment of 45 °C either inhibited bud break or killed the buds. Although temperatures of 42.5 to 45 °C inhibited incorporation of [35S]-methionine into proteins for at least 48 h, several HSPs were synthesized in response to temperatures of 40–45 °C. Immunoblots indicated that one of the heat-induced proteins was immunologically related to HSP70. Increases in free and conjugated forms of ubiquitin were also observed in response to heat treatment. Production of HSPs and ubiquitin, however, was not consistently associated with the heat treatments that induced the highest percentage of bud break. The roles of heat-induced protein degradation, HSPs, and ubiquitin in overcoming dormancy by near-lethal heat stress are discussed.

Keywords: bud dormancy; ecodormancy; endodormancy; near-lethal stress; woody plants

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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