Journal Article

Fall frost resistance in willows used for biomass production. II. Predictive relationships with sugar concentration and dry matter content

Erling Ögren

in Tree Physiology

Volume 19, issue 11, pages 755-760
Published in print September 1999 | ISSN: 0829-318X
Published online September 1999 | e-ISSN: 1758-4469 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/19.11.755
Fall frost resistance in willows used for biomass production. II. Predictive relationships with sugar concentration and dry matter content

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The accumulation of sugars and dry matter in stems in fall was examined in relation to frost hardening in eight willow clones (six clones of Salix viminalis L. and one clone each of S. viminalis × S. schwerenii E. Wolf and S. dasyclados Wimm.). Evidence is presented that three sources of variation in fall frost resistance among the eight clones could be assessed from an analysis of stem composition. First, the pre-hardening value of frost resistance could be assessed from the total sugar concentration. Second, the start of induction of apical growth cessation and hence frost hardening could be distinguished by a stepwise increase in sucrose-to-glucose ratio. Third, the progress of frost hardening during its first phase could be followed from a proportional rise in total sugar concentration and, even more accurately, from a proportional rise in dry-to-fresh weight ratio. In contrast, the second phase of frost hardening was largely uncoupled from sugar and dry matter accumulation. Raffinose and sucrose accumulation seemed to be under differential environmental controls. Sucrose accumulation started with the initiation of growth cessation controlled by photoperiod, whereas raffinose accumulation started with falling temperatures later on. Starch reserves that built up in stems in early fall were partially mobilized later on to support sugar accumulation. In contrast to stems, leaves did not exhibit a preferential accumulation of sucrose in fall.

Keywords: carbohydrate; cold acclimation; cold hardening; cold tolerance; raffinose; Salix; starch; stem; sucrose

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry

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