Journal Article

Low birthweight in infants born to African HIV-infected women: relationship with maternal body weight during pregnancy

K Castetbon, J Ladner, V Leroy, M Chauliac, E Karita, A De Clercq, P Van de Perre, F Dabis, Pregnancy and HIV Study Group (EGE)

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Volume 45, issue 3, pages 152-157
Published in print June 1999 | ISSN: 0142-6338
Published online June 1999 | e-ISSN: 1465-3664 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/45.3.152
Low birthweight in infants born to African HIV-infected women: relationship with maternal body weight during pregnancy

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The effect of maternal HIV infection on birthweight was estimated. In the prenatal clinic of the Centre Hospitalier de Kigali, HIV screening was proposed to women with a gestational age (GA) of less than 28 weeks. HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected (HIF-) women were recruited, when they consented. At inclusion, socioeconomic, obstetrical data, and body weight were collected a clinical examination was performed, and tests for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and malaria were performed. Two prenatal visits were made, at 28-32 and 32-36 weeks, with clinical data and weight measurement. At delivery, birthweight, body length, and head circumference of the infant were documented. At inclusion and at the second follow-up visit, HIV+ women (N = 177) weighted less than HIV- women (N = 194) (p = 0.004). Mean birthweight in infants born to HIV+ women was 2947 g (SD = 429) and 3104 g (SD = 461) in infants born to HIV- women (p = 0.001). Frequencies of low birthweight (LBW, weight <2500 g), prematurity (GA <27 weeks, according to Finnström score at birth), and intrauterine growth retardation (defined by LBW and GA ≥37 weeks) were higher in infants born to HIV+ women than to HIV- women (p = 0.009, 0.01, and 0.053, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression, the association between maternal HIV infection and LBW disappeared (p = 0.61), while low GA (p = 0.01) and low last prenatal weight (p = 0.01) were independant risk factors of LBW. LBW in infants born to HIV+ women could be partly attributable to impaired maternal weight. These results underline the need for nutritional surveillance and dietary counselling, hoping to improve the prognosis of pregnancy in HIV+ women, regardless of other therapeutic interventions.

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Subjects: Paediatrics ; Antitrust Issues and Policies

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