Journal Article

Evaluation of the WHO Clinical Case Definition for Pediatric HIV Infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa

Christine L. van Gend, Maaike L. Haadsma, Pieter J. J. Sauer and Cornelius J. Schoeman

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Volume 49, issue 3, pages 143-147
Published in print June 2003 | ISSN: 0142-6338
Published online June 2003 | e-ISSN: 1465-3664 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/49.3.143
Evaluation of the WHO Clinical Case Definition for Pediatric HIV Infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa

Show Summary Details

Preview

The WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection has been designed to be used in countries where diagnostic laboratory resources are limited. We evaluated the WHO case definition to determine whether it is a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV‐positive and HIV‐negative children. In addition, clinical features not included in this case definition were recorded. We recorded clinical data from 300 consecutively admitted children in a state hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and tested these children for HIV infection. A total of 222 children were included in the study; 69 children (31.1 per cent) were HIV positive. The sensitivity of the WHO case definition in this study was 14.5 per cent, the specificity was 98.6 per cent. Apart from weight loss and generalized dermatitis, the signs of the WHO case definition were significantly more often seen in HIV‐positive than in HIV‐negative children. Of the clinical signs not included in the WHO case definition, marasmus and hepatosplenomegaly especially occurred more frequently in HIV‐positive children. Based on these findings we composed a new case definition consisting of four signs: marasmus, hepatosplenomegaly, oropharyngeal candidiasis, and generalized lymphadenopathy. HIV infection is suspected in a child presenting with at least two of these four signs. The sensitivity of this case definition was 63.2 per cent, the specificity was 96.0 per cent. We conclude that in this study the WHO case definition was not a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV‐positive and HIV‐negative children, mainly because its sensitivity was strikingly low. The simplified case definition we propose, proved to be more sensitive than the WHO case definition (63.2 vs. 14.5 per cent), whilst its specificity remained high.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Paediatrics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.