Journal Article

<i>Plasmodium falciparum</i> Malaria in Nigerian Children During High and Low Transmission Seasons: Gametocyte Carriage and Response to Oral Chloroquine

A. A. Adedeji, F. A. Fehintola, B. A. Fateye, T. C. Happi, A. O. J. Amoo, G. O. Gbotosho and A. Sowunmi

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Volume 51, issue 5, pages 288-294
Published in print October 2005 | ISSN: 0142-6338
Published online October 2005 | e-ISSN: 1465-3664 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmi016
Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Nigerian Children During High and Low Transmission Seasons: Gametocyte Carriage and Response to Oral Chloroquine

Show Summary Details

Preview

Plasmodium falciparum malaria during high and low transmission seasons was evaluated in 1031 children treated with different antimalarial drug in a hyperendemic area of southwestern Nigeria. Seventy-three (10.5%) of 693 and forty (11.8%) of 338 children were gametocyte carriers in the high transmission seasons (HTS) and low transmission seasons (LTS), respectively. In a multiple regression model, two factors were found to be independent risk factors for the presence of gametocytemia at enrolment in the HTS: duration of illness >3 d, and asexual parasite densities less than 10000/μl. Similarly male gender, duration of illness >4 d and parasite density less than 5000/μl were found independent risk factors for presence of gametocytemia during LTS. The presenting parasitemia, parasite clearance times, intensity of gametocytemia and proportion carrying gametocytes post treatment differ significantly in the 333 (32.3%) of these children that were treated with chloroquine in the two seasons. These findings may be important in our understanding of P. falciparum transmission sustenance, response to chloroquine therapy and contribution of chloroquine to gametocyte carriage as seasonal changes occur.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Paediatrics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.