Journal Article

Do Children with Adenotonsillar Hypertrophy have Lower IGF-1 and Ghrelin Levels than the Normal Children?

Tolga Şen and Abdullah Ayçiçek

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Volume 56, issue 3, pages 213-215
Published in print June 2010 | ISSN: 0142-6338
Published online October 2009 | e-ISSN: 1465-3664 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmp093
Do Children with Adenotonsillar Hypertrophy have Lower IGF-1 and Ghrelin Levels than the Normal Children?

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Objective: This study was designed to determine serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and plasma ghrelin levels in male children with adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy and compare them with healthy controls.

Methods: This study included 29 male prepubertal children between the ages of 6.5 and10 years (mean age 8.8 ± 2.5 years) with obstructive adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy and 20 normal male controls between the ages of 5.7 and 10.8 years (mean age 8.2 ± 2.9 years). Plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels were measured at 8.30, in the morning.

Results: Children with adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy had significantly depressed serum IGF-1 levels (203 ± 150 ng ml−1) and plasma ghrelin levels (175 ± 66 pg ml−1) compared with healthy controls (354 ± 242 ng ml−1 and 243 ± 93 pg ml−1, respectively, P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Depressed levels of ghrelin in children with adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy lead to decreased appetite and insufficient energy intake. Lower serum levels of IGF-1 in children with adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy may be secondary to deficient growth hormone stimulation by ghrelin.

Journal Article.  745 words. 

Subjects: Paediatrics

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