Journal Article

Cardiovascular Dysfunction in HIV-infected Children in a Sub-Saharan African Country: Comparative Cross-sectional Observational Study

C. A. N. Okoromah, O. O. Ojo and O. O. Ogunkunle

in Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Volume 58, issue 1, pages 3-11
Published in print February 2012 | ISSN: 0142-6338
Published online February 2011 | e-ISSN: 1465-3664 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmr009
Cardiovascular Dysfunction in HIV-infected Children in a Sub-Saharan African Country: Comparative Cross-sectional Observational Study

Show Summary Details

Preview

Objective: Cardiac dysfunction is rarely diagnosed in HIV-infected children in our setting and standard care does not include baseline and follow-up echocardiography. We aimed to determine the prevalence, pattern and predictors of HIV-related cardiac dysfunction. Methods: Pre-diagnosed HIV-infected children aged 18 months to 12 years from a tertiary teaching hospital in Lagos, South-West Nigeria were enrolled in a comparative, observational cross-sectional study; matched with apparently healthy controls of the same age group, were recruited sequentially between May 2004 and 2007. Proportions of pre-defined cardiac abnormalities such as heart failure diagnosed by clinical examination and dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction by echocardiography were determined. Results: Prevalence of cardiac abnormalities in HIV-infected children was 75.9%. Abnormalities included heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy (33.7%), decreased LVSF of ≤ 25% in 33.7%, increased left ventricular mass (20.5%) and pericardial effusion (14.5%). Conclusion: Structural and functional abnormalities are prevalent in HIV-infected African children and therefore justify inclusion of routine echocardiography in their standard care.

Keywords: HIV/AIDS; cardiac dysfunction; children; cross-sectional study; Lagos; Nigeria

Journal Article.  5103 words. 

Subjects: Paediatrics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.