Journal Article

Child Labor: Lessons from the Historical Experience of Today's Industrial Economies

Jane Humphries

in The World Bank Economic Review

Published on behalf of World Bank

Volume 17, issue 2, pages 175-196
Published in print December 2003 | ISSN: 0258-6770
Published online December 2003 | e-ISSN: 1564-698X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/wber/lhg016
Child Labor: Lessons from the Historical Experience of Today's Industrial Economies

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Child labor was more prevalent in 19th-century industrializers than it is in developing countries today. It was particularly extensive in the earliest industrializers. This pattern may be a source of optimism signaling the spread of technologies that have little use for child labor and of values that endorse the preservation and protection of childhood. Today and historically, orphaned and fatherless children and those in large families are most vulnerable. Efficient interventions to curb child labor involve fiscal transfers to these children and active policies toward street children. Changes in capitalist labor markets (including technology), family strategies, state policies, and cultural norms are examined to shed light on the causes, chronology, and consequences of child labor.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Development Planning and Policy

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