Journal Article

Earnings, Schooling, and Economic Reform: Econometric Evidence From Hungary (1986–2004)

Nauro Campos and Dean Jolliffe

in The World Bank Economic Review

Volume 21, issue 3, pages 509-526
Published in print October 2007 | ISSN: 0258-6770
Published online July 2007 | e-ISSN: 1564-698X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/wber/lhm012
Earnings, Schooling, and Economic Reform: Econometric Evidence From Hungary (1986–2004)

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  • Education and Research Institutions
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How does the relationship between earnings and schooling change with the introduction of comprehensive economic reform? This article sheds light on this question using a unique data set and procedure to reduce sample-selection bias. The evidence is from consistently coded, nonretrospective data for about 4 million Hungarian wage earners. Returns to skill increased 75 percent from 1986 to 2004 (that is, during the period stretching from communism to full membership in the European Union). The winners were those with a college or university education and those employed in the services sector (which here excludes those in public services). The reform losers were those in construction and agriculture, those with only a primary or vocational education (who experienced a decline in returns to their education), and younger workers who acquired most of their education after the main reforms were in place.

Keywords: I20; J20; J24; J31; O15; O52; P20

Journal Article.  6967 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Education and Research Institutions ; Demand and Supply of Labour ; Wages, Compensation, and Labour Costs ; Economic Development ; Economywide Country Studies ; Socialist Systems and Transitional Economies

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