Journal Article

CREDIT POLICIES: LESSONS FROM JAPAN AND KOREA

Dimitri Vittas and Yoon Je Cho

in The World Bank Research Observer

Published on behalf of World Bank

Volume 11, issue 2, pages 277-298
Published in print August 1996 | ISSN: 0257-3032
e-ISSN: 1564-6971 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/wbro/11.2.277
CREDIT POLICIES: LESSONS FROM JAPAN AND KOREA

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The success of policy-based credit programs in Japan and the Republic of Korea suggests that credit policy can be an effective instrument for economic development. Why, then, have credit policies failed in so many countries, and what factors explain their relative success in Japan and Korea?

Both economic and institutional factors appear to be important in the success or failure of credit policies. Essential economic factors include a reliance on the private sector, a bias toward industrialization, an orientation toward export production, the encouragement of domestic competition, and a commitment to price stability. Crucial institutional factors include extensive and frequent consultation between government and the private sector, effective monitoring systems, and, most important, a clear and credible plan for economic development. Although several countries have included one or more of these factors in their programs, the experience of Japan and Korea suggests that a comprehensive network combining all or most of these factors may be necessary for the successful implementation of credit policies.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Development Planning and Policy

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