Journal Article

Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium – III. SN 2006jc: infrared echoes from new and old dust in the progenitor CSM

S. Mattila, W. P. S. Meikle, P. Lundqvist, A. Pastorello, R. Kotak, J. Eldridge, S. Smartt, A. Adamson, C. L. Gerardy, L. Rizzi, A. W. Stephens and S. D. Van Dyk

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Published on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society

Volume 389, issue 1, pages 141-155
Published in print September 2008 | ISSN: 0035-8711
Published online August 2008 | e-ISSN: 1365-2966 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13516.x
Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium – III. SN 2006jc: infrared echoes from new and old dust in the progenitor CSM

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We present near- (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) photometric data of the Type Ibn supernova (SN) 2006jc obtained with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), the Gemini North Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope between days 86 and 493 post-explosion. We find that the IR behaviour of SN 2006jc can be explained as a combination of IR echoes from two manifestations of circumstellar material. The bulk of the NIR emission arises from an IR echo from newly condensed dust in a cool dense shell (CDS) produced by the interaction of the ejecta outward shock with a dense shell of circumstellar material ejected by the progenitor in a luminous blue variable (LBV)-like outburst about two years prior to the SN explosion. The CDS dust mass reaches a modest 3.0 × 10−4M by day 230. While dust condensation within a CDS formed behind the ejecta inward shock has been proposed before for one event (SN 1998S), SN 2006jc is the first one showing evidence for dust condensation in a CDS formed behind the ejecta outward shock in the circumstellar material. At later epochs, a substantial and growing contribution to the IR fluxes arises from an IR echo from pre-existing dust in the progenitor wind. The mass of the pre-existing circumstellar medium (CSM) dust is at least ∼8 × 10−3M. This paper therefore adds to the evidence that mass-loss from the progenitors of core-collapse SNe could be a major source of dust in the Universe. However, yet again, we see no direct evidence that the explosion of an SN produces anything other than a very modest amount of dust.

Keywords: circumstellar matter; supernovae: general; supernovae: individual: SN 2006jc; dust, extinction

Journal Article.  13975 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics

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