Journal Article

On the X-ray emission from massive star clusters and their evolving superbubbles – II. Detailed analytics and observational effects

G. A. Añorve-Zeferino, G. Tenorio-Tagle and S. Silich

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Published on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society

Volume 394, issue 3, pages 1284-1306
Published in print April 2009 | ISSN: 0035-8711
Published online April 2009 | e-ISSN: 1365-2966 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.14423.x
On the X-ray emission from massive star clusters and their evolving superbubbles – II. Detailed analytics and observational effects

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In this work, we present a comprehensive X-ray picture of the interaction between a super star cluster and the interstellar medium. In order to do that, we compare and combine the X-ray emission from the superwind driven by the cluster with the emission from the wind-blown bubble. Detailed analytical models for the hydrodynamics and X-ray luminosity of fast polytropic superwinds are presented. The superwind X-ray luminosity models are an extension of the results obtained in Paper I. Here, the superwind polytropic character allows us to parametrize a wide variety of effects, for instance, radiative cooling. Additionally, X-ray properties that are valid for all bubble models taking thermal evaporation into account are derived. The final X-ray picture is obtained by calculating analytically the expected surface brightness and weighted temperature of each component. All of our X-ray models have an explicit dependence on metallicity and admit general emissivities as functions of the hydrodynamical variables. We consider a realistic X-ray emissivity that separates the contributions from hydrogen and metals. The paper ends with a comparison of the models with observational data.

Keywords: hydrodynamics; stars: winds, outflows; ISM: bubbles; X-rays: ISM

Journal Article.  16530 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics

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