Journal Article

Light curves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

Kazutoshi Numata and Umin Lee

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Published on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society

Volume 409, issue 2, pages 481-490
Published in print December 2010 | ISSN: 0035-8711
Published online November 2010 | e-ISSN: 1365-2966 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17329.x
Light curves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We calculate light curves produced by a hotspot of a rapidly rotating neutron star, assuming that the spot is perturbed by a core r mode, which is destabilized by emitting gravitational waves. To calculate light curves, we take account of relativistic effects, such as the Doppler boost due to the rapid rotation and light bending, assuming the Schwarzschild metric around the neutron star. We assume that the core r modes penetrate to the surface fluid ocean to have sufficiently large amplitudes to disturb the spot. For an l′=m core r mode, the oscillation frequency ω≈ 2mΩ/[l′ (l′+ 1)] defined in the corotating frame of the star will be detected by a distant observer, where l′ and m are, respectively, the spherical harmonic degree and the azimuthal wavenumber of the mode, and Ω is the spin frequency of the star. In a linear theory of oscillation, using a parameter A, we parametrize the mode amplitudes, such that max (|ξθ|, |ξφ|)/R=A at the surface, where ξθ and ξφ are, respectively, the θ and φ components of the displacement vector of the mode and R is the radius of the star. For the l′=m= 2 r mode with ω= 2Ω/3, we find that the fractional Fourier amplitudes at ω= 2Ω/3 in light curves depend on the angular distance θs of the spot centre measured from the rotation axis and become comparable to or even larger than A∼ 0.001 for small values of θs.

Keywords: stars: magnetic field; stars: neutron; stars: oscillations; stars: rotation

Journal Article.  4983 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.