Journal Article

Parameter estimation biases due to contributions from the Rees–Sciama effect to the integrated Sachs–Wolfe spectrum

Björn Malte Schäfer, Angelos Fotios Kalovidouris and Lavinia Heisenberg

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Published on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society

Volume 416, issue 2, pages 1302-1310
Published in print September 2011 | ISSN: 0035-8711
Published online September 2011 | e-ISSN: 1365-2966 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19125.x
Parameter estimation biases due to contributions from the Rees–Sciama effect to the integrated Sachs–Wolfe spectrum

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The subject of this paper is an investigation of the non-linear contributions to the spectrum of the integrated Sachs–Wolfe (iSW) effect. We derive the corrections to the iSW autospectrum and the iSW-tracer cross-spectrum consistently to third order in perturbation theory and analyse the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio for a cross-correlation between the Planck and Euclid data sets as a function of multipole order. We quantify the parameter sensitivity and the statistical error bounds on the cosmological parameters Ωm, σ8, h, ns and w from the linear iSW effect and the systematical parameter estimation bias due to the non-linear corrections in a Fisher formalism, analysing the error budget in its dependence on multipole order. Our results include the following: (i) the spectrum of the non-linear iSW effect can be measured with 0.8σ statistical significance, (ii) non-linear corrections dominate the spectrum starting from ℓ≃ 102, (iii) an anticorrelation of the CMB temperature with tracer density on high multipoles in the non-linear regime, (iv) a much weaker dependence of the non-linear effect on the dark energy model compared to the linear iSW effect and (v) parameter estimation biases amount to less than 0.1σ and weaker than other systematics.

Keywords: cosmic background radiation; cosmological parameters; large-scale structure of Universe

Journal Article.  5619 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics

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