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Mixed-income schools and housing policy in Chicago: a critical examination of the gentrification/education/‘racial’ exclusion nexus

Pauline Lipman

in Mixed Communities

Published by Policy Press

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9781847424938
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781447305538 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/policypress/9781847424938.003.0008
Mixed-income schools and housing policy in Chicago: a critical examination of the gentrification/education/‘racial’ exclusion nexus

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This chapter takes a critical look at the common-sense notion that mixed-income schools in newly constructed mixed-income communities are generative of educational equality and social justice. It locates these policies in relation to neoliberal urban development and the politics of race. The chapter focuses on the assumptions and empirical evidence for current mixed-income projects. The chapter's analysis addresses the ideological basis and intellectual origins of mixed-income strategies, their relation to neoliberal urban restructuring, evidence for mixed income schools and housing, and the implications for educational equity and social and economic justice. The chapter concludes with a framework for alternative policies that draws on Nancy Fraser's three inter-related dimensions of social justice: economic redistribution, cultural recognition and political representation. The analysis focuses on a specific case, Chicago, where mixed-income housing and school policies are joined, discursively and practically.

Keywords: mixed-income schools; educational equality; social justice; neoliberal urban development; Nancy Fraser; urban planning

Chapter.  7152 words. 

Subjects: Urban and Rural Studies

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