Chapter

Social mixing as a cure for negative neighbourhood effects: evidence-based policy or urban myth?

David Manley, Maarten van Ham and Joe Doherty

in Mixed Communities

Published by Policy Press

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9781847424938
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781447305538 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/policypress/9781847424938.003.0011
Social mixing as a cure for negative neighbourhood effects: evidence-based policy or urban myth?

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This chapter begins by outlining the rhetoric of neighbourhood social mix and then turns to critique this through quantitative research that investigates the effect of different levels of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on transitions from unemployment to employment, and the probability of staying in employment for those with a job. It uses individual-level data from the Scottish Longitudinal Study, a 5.3% sample of the Scottish population, covering a 10-year period. The findings are that the characteristics of direct neighbours and those living in neighbouring streets are more important than the characteristics of the wider neighbourhood. They find long-lasting negative effects of living in deprived neighbourhoods, but only a small, if significant, benefit of living in mixed tenure (40–80% social housing) streets and blocks for the unemployed.

Keywords: neighbourhood social mix; housing tenure mix; transitions from unemployment; direct neighbours

Chapter.  6677 words. 

Subjects: Urban and Rural Studies

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