Chapter

Conclusion

Brinkley Messick

in The Calligraphic State

Published by University of California Press

Published in print December 1992 | ISBN: 9780520076051
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520917828 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520076051.003.0014
Conclusion

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The calligraphic state was a phenomenon anchored in the complex authority relations of a spectrum of writings and associated institutions. The characterization of the shari'a as a general societal discourse rather than as “Islamic law” placed emphasis on a historical transition to the codified and legislated form of law. Shari'a codification, new methods of instruction, changes in court procedures, and legal-document registration are among the diverse expressions of a fundamental reordering of Yemeni society. The “calligraphic state” is itself a construct, referring neither to a specific polity and its dissolution nor to a particular discursive moment and its transformation. It is instead a composite of historical materials and must finally give way to the phenomena out of which it was built.

Keywords: calligraphic state; shari'a; law; codification; court procedures; Yemeni society

Chapter.  1724 words. 

Subjects: Anthropology

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