Chapter

Introduction

Carolyn Nordstrom and Antonius C. G. M. Robben

in Fieldwork Under Fire

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 1996 | ISBN: 9780520089938
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520915718 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520089938.003.0001
Introduction

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This chapter focuses on the three principal concerns of this book: the everyday experiences of people who are the victims and perpetuators of violence; the relationship between field-workers and the people studied, including the distinct research problems and experiences of ethnographers who study situations of violence; and the theoretical issues that emerge from studying topics that involve personal danger. These remarks elaborate on the notion implicit in this book, that the lived experience of violence, the epistemology of violence, and the ways of knowing and reflecting about violence are not separate. Experience and interpretation are inseparable for perpetrators, victims, and ethnographers alike. Anthropology on this level involves a number of responsibilities above and beyond those associated with more traditional ethnography: responsibilities to the field-worker's safety, to the safety of his or her informants, and to the theories that help to forge attitudes toward the reality of violence.

Keywords: ethnic cleansing; violence; anthropology; personal danger; ethnographers; research problems

Chapter.  10045 words. 

Subjects: Theory and Practice of Anthropology

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