Chapter

America's Mission

Edited by Ronald Steel

in America and the Misshaping of a New World Order

Published by University of California Press

Published in print June 2010 | ISBN: 9780520098701
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520943797 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520098701.003.0002
America's Mission

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After the implosion of the erstwhile Soviet Union, the world became unipolar, with the United States at its center and Washington as its seat of authority. From its position of economic strength and military invulnerability, the United States had the ability to impose the political order it deemed desirable upon the world. It was even suggested that the United States controlled the course of globalization, or the ways in which it becomes manifest in global power struggles. However, the incidents of 9/11 shattered the illusion of invulnerability that underlay America's approach to the world. Nuclear dominance had become irrelevant against those who conducted warfare at a technologically primitive level. To the people of the West, globalization may mean modernization and the adoption of superior Western social and political values and institutions. But to people in societies emerging from decades of impoverishment and technological backwardness it means using Western technology to liberate themselves from Western domination.

Keywords: political order; globalization; America's approach; nuclear dominance; western domination

Chapter.  4852 words. 

Subjects: Anthropology

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