Chapter

Approximations of Chinese Bandits: Perverse Rebels, Romantic Heroes, or Frustrated Bachelors?

David Ownby

in Chinese Femininities/Chinese Masculinities

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2002 | ISBN: 9780520211032
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520935303 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520211032.003.0009
Approximations of Chinese Bandits: Perverse Rebels, Romantic Heroes, or Frustrated Bachelors?

Show Summary Details

Preview

Although rebels and bandits are hardly the masculine equivalent of prostitutes, they occupy similar positions at the margins of mainstream Chinese society and sometimes also figure in comparable ways in elite and popular discourses about exciting or dangerous forms of behavior. The goal of this chapter is to collect and examine depictions of bandits. For that purpose, it adopts a very broad definition of the term bandit. In addition to rural outlaws, it also includes for discussion secret societies, urban gangs, religious groups identified by the state as heterodox, rebel bands, and even feuding groups. Although there are undeniable differences among these categories, the groups described nonetheless share a number of common characteristics. To search for commentary on these groups, the chapter takes on a random bandit group from the late Ming period onwards and also collects approximations from elite, popular, traditional, and modern sources.

Keywords: bandit; rebel; prostitute; heterodox; approximations

Chapter.  11730 words. 

Subjects: Anthropology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.