Chapter

Conclusion

Scott Spector

in Prague Territories

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2000 | ISBN: 9780520219090
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520929777 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520219090.003.0008
Conclusion

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This chapter discusses how the study began with the paradoxical claim that its subjects were at once atypical and symptomatic of their period, and therefore of a special kind of interest. The tension between a radically idiosyncratic position and a more general, grounded or “healthy” condition is not trivial, and more should be said about it. The creative works of the Prague circle constituted islands in the rift of a modern crisis, or projected bridges intended to span a declining world and a new one, which never materialized. If it had, those works would not seem to be speaking in a language of islands, bridges, and circles, but with other terms, which cannot be discerned, and which could not be deciphered from vantage.

Keywords: paradoxical claim; radically idiosyncratic position; healthy condition; Prague circle; modern crisis

Chapter.  3130 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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