Chapter

The Ambiguities of Radiation Effects

J. Samuel Walker

in Permissible Dose

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2000 | ISBN: 9780520223288
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520924840 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520223288.003.0005
The Ambiguities of Radiation Effects

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In estimating the dangers of radiation to large population groups, the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki will be the most important basis. It supplied the best available epidemiological data on the effects of radiation on humans. Epidemiological studies of persons exposed to radiation in their jobs or in medical treatments were even more inconclusive. For further explanation about the radiation effects, there is a series of investigations in areas near Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and other nuclear plants, and a variety of other epidemiological analyses of radiation hazards did not produce clear results. The Three Mile Island accident created enormous public fear that it would cause a heavy toll in cancer deaths in the areas around the plant.

Keywords: Three Mile Island; Chernobyl; nuclear; plant; public fear; radiation; health

Chapter.  11655 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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