Chapter

Mrs. Yasuda and Mr. Yasuda: Manufacturer’s Widow and Manufacturer’s Mother: Manufacturer, Manufacturer’s Son, and Manufacturer’s Father

Tamara K. Hareven

in The Silk Weavers of Kyoto

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2003 | ISBN: 9780520228177
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520935761 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520228177.003.0013
Mrs. Yasuda and Mr. Yasuda: Manufacturer’s Widow and Manufacturer’s Mother: Manufacturer, Manufacturer’s Son, and Manufacturer’s Father

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At the time of the interview, Mrs. Yasuda Toshie still worked eight hours a day in the Yasuda Tsuzure Company. The Yasuda Company was turned into a corporation after World War II, but continues to be owned and run by the family. Two years after interviewing Mrs. Yasuda, her son (Mr. Yasuda Genichiro) was interviewed. By that time, Mrs. Yasuda had retired but continued to come into the company from time to time in an advisory capacity. The Yasuda Company is known in Nishijin for its original, high-class tsuzure weavings. Mrs. Yasuda's Japanese style of discourse reflects extreme modesty, using third person rather than first when she refers to herself. Mrs. Yasuda said that they will never go bankrupt in Nishijin because everybody has a small business. Her son stated that the products of Japanese traditional industries should not be monopolized by the Japanese alone.

Keywords: Mrs. Yasuda Toshie; Mr. Yasuda Genichiro; Yasuda Tsuzure Company; tsuzure weavings; Nishijin; traditional industries

Chapter.  6090 words. 

Subjects: Occupations, Professions, and Work

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