Chapter

“Twice-born” from the Waters: The Two-Hundred-Year Journey of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Indians

Raymond Cross

in Lewis & Clark

Published by University of California Press

Published in print February 2004 | ISBN: 9780520228399
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520937147 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520228399.003.0006
“Twice-born” from the Waters: The Two-Hundred-Year Journey of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Indians

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This chapter assesses Lewis and Clark using the perspective of the Native Americans, specifically the Arikara, the Mandan, and the Hidatsa. Lewis and Clark encountered these Native Americans during the expedition and introduced both disease and treaties to these groups. It describes the struggles of these Native Americans to regain the autonomy and strength that they possessed during their encounter with Lewis and Clark. The chapter also decenters the “historic” significance of Lewis and Clark by looking at their efforts from a tribal perspective and suggests that Lewis and Clark may have brought minor tragedies into these Native American groups.

Keywords: Native Americans; Arikara; Mandan; Hidatsa; disease; treaties; tribal perspective; historic significance; Lewis and Clark

Chapter.  11960 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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