Chapter

After the Fall: Attempts to Establish an Explicitly Theological Voice in Debates over Science and Medicine after 1960

John H. Evans

in The Secular Revolution

Published by University of California Press

Published in print June 2003 | ISBN: 9780520230002
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520936706 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520230002.003.0010
After the Fall: Attempts to Establish an Explicitly Theological Voice in Debates over Science and Medicine after 1960

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This chapter examines the journey of the development of Science and Medicine, relating it to the understanding of the secularization theory. During the 1960s, Science came to be seen as producing a number of side-effects, such as environmental pollution and overpopulation, which were perceived to be the result of improving agriculture and medicine. Technological improvements suggested that humans could have a control over themselves. Scientists had full jurisdiction over promulgating the ethics of their own work. Following this, the second era began with giving up on an explicitly theological voice of ends, and fell back into having the ethics of science and medicine focusing on secularly stated ends that were translations of theological ends. This seed ironically grew into a challenge to the jurisdiction of theology, and the new profession of bioethics was born. As bioethicists gained strength, the theological challenge slowly receded, and this marked the third and the final era.

Keywords: science; medicine; secularization; theological voice; bioethics

Chapter.  13122 words. 

Subjects: Religious Studies

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