Chapter

Conclusion

Ian F. Mcneely

in The Emancipation of Writing

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2003 | ISBN: 9780520233300
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520928527 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520233300.003.0010
Conclusion

Show Summary Details

Preview

This book has tracked changes in writing practice over a tumultuous period in Germany's history by examining four separate, yet interlocking, aspects of its civic culture. All four of these concepts denote crucial elements in the seamless web of cognitive and social practices undergirding civil society, and each retains its importance in the shift from the early modern to the modern world in Germany. The book has also concentrated on the emancipation of writing from official tutelage. The data suggests that while the voluntary association stands as the primary crystallized, institutional embodiment of civil society in the modern world, it is insufficient to approach its history with an exclusive focus on its outward, epiphenomenal manifestations. The history of official writing sheds light on the frameworks for action and imagination where citizenship in civil society first acquired this emancipatory potential.

Keywords: writing; Germany; civic culture; civil society; emancipation; official tutelage

Chapter.  3023 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.