Chapter

Introduction

Stephen V. Tracy

in Athens and Macedon

Published by University of California Press

Published in print April 2003 | ISBN: 9780520233331
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520928541 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520233331.003.0001
Introduction

Show Summary Details

Preview

Cutters learned by an apprentice system and presumably began to work by doing odd jobs in the shop at a very tender age. Some, undoubtedly, would have learned to cut letters well enough to become full-fledged inscribers of decrees by the age of fourteen or fifteen. Dates for archons are presented in many cases with some hesitancy. The third century was a time of transition for the lettering of Attic decrees. All inscribers gave some thought to layout. Cutters developed their own habits of inscribing. At the same time, it is probable, given that there were potters' quarters and metalworkers' quarters, that inscribers of decrees too worked in fairly close proximity to one another and knew one another's work.

Keywords: cutters; inscribers; archons; Attic decrees; lettering; inscribing

Chapter.  2476 words. 

Subjects: Greek and Roman Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.