Chapter

The U.S. Apparel Industry

Ellen Israel Rosen

in Making Sweatshops

Published by University of California Press

Published in print March 2002 | ISBN: 9780520233362
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520928572 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520233362.003.0006
The U.S. Apparel Industry

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This chapter explores how U.S. apparel producers reacted to the impact of low-wage textile and apparel imports from Asia. The bargain achieved by labor and management in the U.S. apparel industry has been viewed as a model of cooperation. Protectionists found it difficult to negotiate with either the Truman or the Eisenhower administration. The growing power of the protectionists in Congress made Kennedy worry that protectionists would thwart his efforts to negotiate tariff reductions in Europe. Trade liberalization and the growth of imports dramatically increased the number of workers displaced from their jobs. The apparel industry was not as successful in incorporating technology. Apparel producers using new technologies did enjoy significant productivity gains, but their increased productivity was not as high as in other industries. Apparel producers using new technologies did enjoy significant productivity gains, but their increased productivity was not as high as in other industries.

Keywords: U.S. apparel industry; apparel imports; Kennedy; protectionists; trade liberalization; apparel producers

Chapter.  9323 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Occupations, Professions, and Work

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