Chapter

Henry Morton Stanley and the New Journalism

Edward Berenson

in Heroes of Empire

Published by University of California Press

Published in print June 2010 | ISBN: 9780520234277
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520947191 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520234277.003.0002
Henry Morton Stanley and the New Journalism

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  • Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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Henry Morton Stanley's personal charisma developed only later in his life, not until the spring of 1890 when he returned home in apparent triumph from what would be his final African voyage. The Stanley-Livingstone meeting provided a spectacular occasion for a new kind of journalism. The crime story became the staple of the new journalism in France and the United States, its dominance such that the fait divers' distinctive style, with its dialogue, characters, action, suspense, and progression of events, would spill over into most other forms of reportage. The writings of Livingstone, Burton, and other travelers showed Stanley how to mount and conduct an expedition into the African interior. By the late 1880s, many would endorse the notion that Stanley resembled the mythic heroes whose courage and manly abilities provided models for contemporary men.

Keywords: Henry Morton Stanley; Livingstone; African voyage; new journalism; France; United States

Chapter.  10965 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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