Chapter

Constituting Differences

Schechter Ronald

in Obstinate Hebrews

Published by University of California Press

Published in print April 2003 | ISBN: 9780520235571
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520929357 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520235571.003.0006
Constituting Differences

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  • Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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This chapter considers whether the “emancipation” that the Revolution enacted was good or bad for the Jews. It asks why revolutionaries spent so much time and energy thinking about the Jews, discussing and debating their status and proposing and passing laws directed at them specifically. It also asks what contemporary representations, by Gentiles as well as Jews, of the relationship between Jews and the mythically emerging French nation can tell about the Revolution itself: its values, its discourses, its contradictions. The number of potential active Jewish citizens would have been no more than twenty-five hundred if the median income of Jews was comparable to Gentiles in France. The Jews of Nancy were nevertheless better off than the majority of their coreligionists in France, though less wealthy than the portugais of Bordeaux.

Keywords: emancipation; Revolution; coreligionists; portugais; Bordeaux

Chapter.  18820 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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