Chapter

Democracy, Nationalism, and Contesting the Palestinian Curriculum

Nathan J. Brown

in Palestinian Politics after the Oslo Accords

Published by University of California Press

Published in print March 2003 | ISBN: 9780520237629
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520937789 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520237629.003.0006
Democracy, Nationalism, and Contesting the Palestinian Curriculum

Show Summary Details

Preview

The centrality of Palestinian education resembled the situation in other Arab countries that had grabbed their independence in prolonged struggles. Nationalist leaders throughout the Arab world have claimed that their unwanted rulers starved the educational system of the resources it needed. Palestinian education resembled neighboring Arab systems in method and substance; indeed, the curriculum was a direct copy of the Jordanian (for the West Bank) and the Egyptian (for Gaza). Palestinians fought with the mandatory government in the education arena on several fronts. Many of the features of the Palestinian educational system lay firmly established by the time the mandate ended in 1948. The control of the system was politically sensitive, and the public system was supplemented by an extensive private system.

Keywords: West Bank; Jordanian education; Egyptian education; nationalist leaders; centralization

Chapter.  22774 words. 

Subjects: Asian History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.