Chapter

. Patients into Prisoners

Peter Baldwin

in Disease and Democracy

Published by University of California Press

Published in print May 2005 | ISBN: 9780520243507
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520940796 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520243507.003.0005
. Patients into Prisoners

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  • Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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This chapter discusses the criminalization of the irresponsible behavior of AIDS patients by transmitting the disease to other individuals. Despite their markedly different legal traditions, Germany and the United States used criminal law most heavily, providing sanctions against transmissive behavior. All nations put their penal codes to use. All had provisions for bodily injury, sometimes specifically focused on actions like poisoning that could in theory be used against the knowing transmission of contagious disease. This chapter also discusses the aspects of perinatal transmission of HIV and breast feeding, including the laws enacted in several industrialized countries regarding HIV transmission during pregnancy.

Keywords: HIV; pregnancy; breast feeding; infants; AIDS; penal code; laws

Chapter.  5314 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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