Chapter

Religion and <i>Ius Publicum</i>

Clifford Ando

in The Matter of the Gods

Published by University of California Press

Published in print February 2008 | ISBN: 9780520250833
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520933651 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520250833.003.0004
Religion and Ius Publicum

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The two great codifications of law undertaken in the Christianity of late ancient times are often presented as novel interventions in the history of religion. As the first such codification since the Twelve Tables a thousand years before, the Theodosian Code did more than advertise the maturation of imperial government. It aggressively highlighted the government's adherence to Christianity. In this chapter, the author attempts to describe the ambitions of the Codes and to distinguish them from each other. The author also points out two things: (1) neither text cites the Twelve Tables as a precedent; and (2) neither Code actually described any of its books as devoted to “religion” in any catholic or totalizing sense of the world.

Keywords: Twelve Tables; Theodosian Code; religion; Christianity; precedent

Chapter.  12803 words. 

Subjects: Religion in the Ancient World

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