Chapter

The Development of Intelligence Services and Security Policing in North Africa and the Middle East

Thomas Martin

in Empires of Intelligence

Published by University of California Press

Published in print September 2007 | ISBN: 9780520251175
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520933743 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520251175.003.0001
The Development of Intelligence Services and Security Policing in North Africa and the Middle East

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  • Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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The purpose of this chapter is twofold: to explain the types of intelligence gathering conducted in Arab territories controlled by France and Britain after World War I, and to trace the development of the security agencies that conducted it. Identifying the various military, police, and intelligence agencies that comprised the imperial security services in the Arab world between 1918 and 1939 is less straightforward than one might imagine. The reason is, in large part, one of boundaries: jurisdictional, administrative, and racial. Colonial administrations were more animated by problems of internal security than were the metropolitan governments they served. Administrators outside the security services thus were integral to the process of information collection and analysis. Colonial states were intelligence states insofar as the entire bureaucratic apparatus of imperial administration in Muslim territories contributed to state surveillance of the subject population.

Keywords: intelligence gathering; Arab; territories; France; Britain; security agencies; administrations; governments; Muslim; population

Chapter.  12710 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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