Chapter

Keeping Families Connected: Women Organizing for Telephone Justice in the Face of Corporate-State Greed

Lauren Melodia and Annette Warren Dickerson

in Interrupted Life

Published by University of California Press

Published in print January 2010 | ISBN: 9780520252493
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520944565 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520252493.003.0070
Keeping Families Connected: Women Organizing for Telephone Justice in the Face of Corporate-State Greed

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Since the mid-1980s, single-carrier collect-call systems have become the norm for telephone service in prisons across the United States. Under these monopolistic systems, incarcerated individuals may only call people collect, and loved ones who accept the calls must accept the terms and rates dictated by the phone company. For many incarcerated persons, “rights” must include the right to communicate with family and allies on the outside, free of the outrageous surcharges that telephone companies, in collusion with the governments of some states, have tacked on to calls into and out of prisons. This chapter explains the damage these practices have caused families and describes the campaigns that prisoners, their families, and allies have organized for “telephone justice.” The New York Campaign for Telephone Justice arose out of conversations among prisoners, their loved ones on the outside, and people in the community.

Keywords: New York Campaign for Telephone Justice; prisoners; telephone justice; New York; prisons; telephone service; families; telephone companies

Chapter.  2905 words. 

Subjects: Gender and Sexuality

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