Chapter

The Destroyer’s Creation

Daniel Burton-Rose

in Guerrilla USA

Published by University of California Press

Published in print June 2010 | ISBN: 9780520264281
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780520946033 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520264281.003.0009
The Destroyer’s Creation

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In December 1974, Seattle Police Chief Robert Hanson decided to arm his force with hollow-point bullets, highly lethal projectiles designed to explode inside their target. Local organizers immediately called a demonstration to decry the policy. Edward Allen Mead walked with the crowd, which was supervised by officers on horseback, but declined to participate in the chants. It was one of the last rallies he attended before his next incarceration. The most militant protests in Seattle occurred in the primarily black Central District. Tyree Scott, the charismatic leader of the United Construction Workers Association, denounced local contractors who received federal money to hire blacks but persistently refused to do so. This chapter recounts the tensions between inmates and the administration at the Washington State Penitentiary that led to hostage taking by inmates, including Danny Atteberry. It also looks at Mead's construction of a pipe bomb in collaboration with a friend, Bruce Seidel, with the headquarters of the Division of Corrections in Olympia as their first target. Finally, the chapter examines how the George Jackson Brigade came into existence.

Keywords: Edward Allen Mead; pipe bomb; Danny Atteberry; Washington State Penitentiary; Bruce Seidel; Seattle; United Construction Workers; militant protests; George Jackson Brigade

Chapter.  3045 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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