Journal Article

Chinese Conversion to Evangelical Christianity: The Importance of Social and Cultural Contexts

Fenggang Yang

in Sociology of Religion

Published on behalf of Association for the Sociology of Religion

Volume 59, issue 3, pages 237-257
Published in print January 1998 | ISSN: 1069-4404
Published online January 1998 | e-ISSN: 1759-8818 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3711910
Chinese Conversion to Evangelical Christianity: The Importance of Social and Cultural Contexts

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Religion
  • Sociology of Religion

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Why do immigrants abandon their traditional religion and convert to Protestant Christianity? Existing sociological theories of conversion are mostly based on studies of individuals who convert into cults. Factors of individual personality and interpersonal bonds in small networks, or assimilation motives, cannot adequately explain the growing phenomenon of conversion to evangelical Protestantism among new immigrant groups from Asia and Latin America. Based on interviews and ethnographic observations in Chinese churches in the Greater Washington, D.C., area, I argue that social and cultural changes in China in the process of coerced modernization are the most important factor for Chinese conversion to Christianity; identity reconstruction of immigrant Chinese in a pluralist modern society also contributes to Chinese conversion to evangelical Christianity; institutional factors are of secondary importance. This study also has important theoretical implications to the ongoing debates concerning the reasons for and sources of growth among conservative Christian churches in the US.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Sociology of Religion

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.