Journal Article

Y2K, The Apocalypse, and Evangelical Christianity: The Role of Eschatological Belief in Church Responses

Lisa McMinn

in Sociology of Religion

Published on behalf of Association for the Sociology of Religion

Volume 62, issue 2, pages 205-220
Published in print January 2001 | ISSN: 1069-4404
Published online January 2001 | e-ISSN: 1759-8818 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3712456
Y2K, The Apocalypse, and Evangelical Christianity: The Role of Eschatological Belief in Church Responses

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Apocalyptic beliefs in Christianity have endured for two thousand years and on occasion have motivated and justified radical and even revolutionary collective action (Boyer 1992). Why apocalyptic visions are part of some Christians' belief system is grounded in their beliefs about the end times, or eschatologies, that shape church cultures and subsequent behaviors. This paper considers cultural aspects of collective action, applying the concept of frames that give events meaning and inspire and legitimize collective behavior to Christian church responses to Y2K as a recent example of an anticipated apocalyptic event. Five interpretive frames linking eschatological ideation with specific collective behaviors are identified and discussed, as well as three corresponding strategic responses to Y2K that were taken by various kinds of Protestant Christian churches as they prepared for the ushering in of a new millennium.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Sociology of Religion

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