Chapter

King and Kingdom

Michael Brown

in The Wars of Scotland 1214–1371

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print April 2004 | ISBN: 9780748612376
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748672301 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748612376.003.0002
King and Kingdom

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  • Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)

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Late on the evening of Thursday, 4 December 1214, King William of Scotland died at Stirling. On the afternoon of Friday, 5 December, William's son Alexander, a youth of sixteen was crowned king. In a week of celebration and mourning, royal authority was transferred from William, who had ruled the kingdom for nearly half a century, to his young son, the new King Alexander II. What was Alexander inheriting? His kingdom was understood less as a territorial unit than as a collection of rights, customs and communities. At the centre and at the summit of this network stood the king. For the Scottish kingdom, the making of a new king, his inauguration, was the most important ceremony and the most important political act in the realm.

Keywords: Scottish history; Scottish kingdom; King William of Scotland; King Alexander II; inauguration

Chapter.  5849 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500)

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