Chapter

War Aims in Modern History

Victor Rothwell

in War Aims in the Second World War

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print March 2005 | ISBN: 9780748615025
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748651283 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748615025.003.0001
War Aims in Modern History

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War aims bearing some resemblance to those that were to feature in the Second World War may be dated back to the sixteenth century. If religious strife may be regarded as the ancestor of the ideological conflicts that were to influence the Second World War, the split between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism and the rising power of the Ottoman Empire as an Islamic superstate was a watershed. This chapter examines the evolution of war aims elucidated by the Kingdom of Great Britain; the urge of establishing Russia as a European power in the early eighteenth century; the greatest power in Europe – France – and the unfolding of its revolution from 1789; and Germany and its junior ally, Austria-Hungary, which was the driving force to war in 1914.

Keywords: France; Britain; Russia; European powers; warfare; religious strife; Germany

Chapter.  9860 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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