Chapter

The Fifteenth Century

Alexander Broadie

in A History of Scottish Philosophy

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print December 2008 | ISBN: 9780748616275
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748652471 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748616275.003.0003
The Fifteenth Century

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Scotland's first three universities were founded in the fifteenth century, and prior to the earliest of them, St Andrews, almost all young Scots in search of a university education had gone to the continent. In fifteenth-century Scotland some philosophy was written by men who were not university teachers. This chapter presents a brief indication of the philosophical contents of Meroure of Wyssdome. It then moves on from the doctrine that divine governance of the created world is conducted on the basis of the fact that the ruler of the universe is a God of justice with perfect knowledge of his subjects and infinite power. It is not clear whether the arguments John Ireland musters in support of a hereditary monarchy are stronger than those in support of an elected monarchy. He also has at least considerable sympathy for the principle of election.

Keywords: fifteenth century; John Ireland; Meroure of Wyssdome; Scotland; St Andrews; God; divine governance; hereditary monarchy; elected monarchy; election

Chapter.  5804 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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