Chapter

The Nineteenth Century: Ferrier to Seth

Alexander Broadie

in A History of Scottish Philosophy

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print December 2008 | ISBN: 9780748616275
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748652471 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748616275.003.0010
The Nineteenth Century: Ferrier to Seth

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The Scottish Enlightenment was a stunning intellectual performance that set the intellectual agenda for many people inside and outside Scotland for many decades thereafter. George Davie argues that Sir William Hamilton's pupil and friend James Frederick Ferrier was in substantial measure responsible for the blackout of the Scottish Enlightenment in the 1850s. Ferrier's greatest work is perhaps An Introduction to the Philosophy of Consciousness, which originally appeared as a series of seven papers in Blackwood's Magazine. Consciousness implies an act of negation, for the self must distinguish itself from nature as a self in relation to not-self. The contributions of Alexander Bain and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison are elaborated. Many of Scottish idealists wrote extensively on the practical implications, whether social or political, of their philosophy.

Keywords: James Frederick Ferrier; Alexander Bain; Pringle-Pattison; Scottish Enlightenment; consciousness; philosophy

Chapter.  9895 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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