Chapter

Whose Independence? Bishop Jocelin of Glasgow (1175–99) and the Achievement of Ecclesiastical Freedom

Dauvit Broun

in Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print March 2007 | ISBN: 9780748623600
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748653416 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748623600.003.0023
Whose Independence? Bishop Jocelin of Glasgow (1175–99) and the Achievement of Ecclesiastical Freedom

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This chapter explores the origins of the arrangements of the Church, which comprises a group of independent dioceses under its own archbishop, directly answerable to Rome and not to the kingdom. It argues that the kingdom's ecclesiastical freedom was very far from being inevitable: Cum universi can be regarded as the brainchild of one man, Bishop Jocelin of Glasgow, who may personally be credited with changing the course of Scotland's history by this achievement. It examines Bishop Jocelin's motives, which showed that the issue of independence, both in a Scottish and an ecclesiastical context, was much less straightforward than has previously been imagined. It opines that the key to the background of Cum universi and an appreciation of Bishop Jocelin's achievement is an understanding of the aspirations of the bishops of Glasgow and their clergy during the second half of the twelfth century.

Keywords: independent dioceses; archbishop; Rome; ecclesiastical freedom; Cum universi; Bishop Jocelin; independence

Chapter.  15924 words. 

Subjects: Regional and Area Studies

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