Chapter

Holy Places, Contested Spaces: British Pakistani Accounts of Pilgrimage to Makkah and Madinah

Peter Hopkins and Richard Gale

in Muslims in Britain

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print March 2009 | ISBN: 9780748625871
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748671335 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748625871.003.0008
Holy Places, Contested Spaces: British Pakistani Accounts of Pilgrimage to Makkah and Madinah

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter presents an argument that Muslim identities are increasingly standardised and homogenised in the global postmodern requires significant qualification. In underscoring the significance of ‘being there’, pilgrims strengthened the idea of the holy places as a spiritual homeland and ‘one of the primal scenes of Islam’. The sacrifice of 'id al-'adha, sometimes known as 'id al-kabir (the ‘big’ festival), is the normative culmination of the Hajj. The increasing mobility and prosperity linked with international migration has meant that pilgrimage to Makkah and Madinah has become more affordable, convenient and democratised for Pakistanis in Britain than it was for their ancestors. British Pakistanis report pilgrimage not only as an emotional and testing personal journey from sinfulness to purification but also as a collective return to the mythic homeland of the umma and, ultimately, all monotheistic humanity.

Keywords: pilgrims; Muslim identities; British Pakistanis; Islam; pilgrimage; Makkah; Madinah; Britain

Chapter.  8292 words. 

Subjects: Islam

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.