Chapter

Towards the Modern Nation

Andrew Lincoln

in Walter Scott and Modernity

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print April 2007 | ISBN: 9780748626069
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748651870 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626069.003.0002
Towards the Modern Nation

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This chapter examines how the understanding of the writer's role as an agent of national reconciliation takes shape in Scott's first three poetic romances and in his first novel. It shows that Scott's poems define feudal independence in opposition to modern sensitivities, law and centralised power, and also directly addresses the contrast between feudal allegiance and state authority. The chapter furthermore determines that Waverley is situated in the modern writing scene, where readers rely on the characters' recollections in order to gain more information about the past.

Keywords: national reconciliation; feudal independence; feudal allegiance; state authority; modern sensitivities; modern writing scene

Chapter.  16149 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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